Introducing A Pet Into New Home
February 17, 2021
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Protect pets by getting them microchipped

Statistics show, one in three pets become lost at some point in their lives.

If you have ever lost your pet you will have experienced first hand the worry and fear that comes as you wonder if you will ever see them again. If they’re wearing a collar and identification tag, it’s a good chance that you’ll get them back.

But what if the collar comes off? Of the millions of dogs and cats that enter U.S. animal shelters every year, only a small percentage of dogs and cats are ever reunited with their owners. Of those pets lucky enough to be reunited, it is usually because they were identified with a microchip or identification tag. 

June is National Microchip Month, which is a great time to raise awareness about pet microchips. Microchipping is a relatively inexpensive procedure that can help save a pet’s life.

Microchipping involves implanting a device about the size of a grain of rice into the scruff of an animal’s neck, a process that is quick and painless for your pet like getting a vaccination. Every chip has a unique identification number encased in a protective shell which can be read by a microchip scanner, allowing them to be traced back to their rightful owner.

A pet microchip is a small electronic device, about the size of a grain of rice. It’s inserted under the loose skin between your pet’s shoulder blades, a process that is quick and painless for your pet like getting a vaccination. Every chip has a unique identification number encased in a protective shell which can be read by a microchip scanner.

A microchip is only the first step. You must register your pet’s microchip to give your pet the best protection. It’s important to keep your pets information up-to-date. If your pet gets lost and is taken to a vet clinic or animal shelter, your pet will be scanned for a microchip to reveal his unique ID number. That number will be called into the pet recovery service, and you will be contacted using the contact information on file with your pet’s microchip.

If you adopt your pet from an animal shelter or rescue organization, they may include microchipping as part of their adoption fee. You can also visit your local veterinary offices to get it done as well as some animal shelters.

All pets should wear collar tags imprinted with their name and the phone number of their owner, but only a microchip provides permanent ID that cannot fall off, be removed, or become impossible to read. Microchips are good for 25 years so they do not have to be replaced.

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